In this introductory course, students will learn about the interplay between various sub-disciplines of Linguistics. They will explore the phonology, morphology, syntax and pragmatics of English, by analysing texts from various genres.

Students who enrolled in the BA English & American Studies degree before October 2016 are encouraged to complete a work placement in partial fulfilment of the requirements of their qualification.  This class is designed to assist students with applying for suitable internships, becoming effective communicators and learning the ropes of working in an English-medium environment.

In this blended course, students will undertake online, classroom and field tasks as they hone their teaching skills by studying the methods of professional teachers at selected schools throughout Saxony.  After participating in compulsory introductory sessions on the principles of classroom observation and the rules of engagement, students will then venture onto their school visits and prepare for their individual recorded micro-teaching sessions.  The practical language teaching component of this course must be carried out at an approved institution.

The IT course serves as an introduction to the academic endeavour in that students learn about the standards and practices of various research communities within the field of digital humanities. 

After surveying global trends in English language teaching, students will delve into the visions, values and underlying assumptions that are inherent in an assortment of educational curricula used in Germany.  They will explore the distinctions between idealised, enacted and evaluated curricula before moving onto syllabus design, lesson planning and materials development, specifically for the English language classroom. 

Vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, pragmatics and procedural knowledge are all a mere selection of factors that are indicative of a learner’s target language proficiency:  How learners acquire these and other competencies is the subject of this semester-long sojourn into the realm of language acquisition.  Theories pertaining to psychology, cognitivism, information processing and contemporary teaching practice are covered, and students are alerted to the controversies and inconsistencies in the field, as well as to some areas for further exploration.

In this course, students will improve their academic writing skills with a view to successfully composing term papers and their MA Thesis in their fourth semester. We will take a closer look at various formal and stylistic aspects of thesis writing, for instance good chapter and paragraph structures, citations, register, linguistic accuracy, and appropriate and varied vocabulary. (Students discuss content with their professorial supervisors.)

The course will consist of a survey introduction which focuses on formal and stylistic difficulties of writing a thesis and related student questions, as well as several individual consultations.
Being able to communicate accurately and fluently in English is not only essential in today's international business settings but also for career success. It is a skill that every employee from clerk to manager and senior executive must have. This course is designed to extend students’ English communication skills in a variety of professional settings. Students will polish their presentation, debate and discussion skills and will be exposed to and practice the language of business meetings and interviews. Grammatical and lexical accuracy, stylistic appropriateness and successful persuasive skills will play as much a role as effective non-verbal communication and good use of visual aids.
In this course, students will learn to improve their reading skills to become good and efficient readers. Even though every student has learned “how to read”, not everyone knows how to read effectively. Using a variety of primary and secondary sources, we will address reading skills such as preview reading, skimming and scanning, reading for main ideas, reading for details and reading for inference. Strategies for dealing with unknown vocabulary will play as much a role as skills in using the information gained from reading, e.g. summarizing, paraphrasing or creating charts and tables.